DEXA

Dual Emission X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA or DEXA) is also referred to as Bone Mineral Densitometry. This scan measures the level of certain minerals in bones to give an indication of the strength of bones and the likelihood of fracture or bone disintegration. Your doctor may suggest you undergo this scan to screen for indicators of osteoporosis (brittle bones)

  • Bone Mineral Densitometry
  • Body Composition Assessments

Bone Mineral Densitometrty

Osteoporosis often goes undiagnosed until a fracture occurs.

Osteoporosis is a chronic and ‘silent’ disease because it usually shows no symptoms until a person has their first fracture. And about 50% of people with one bone fracture will have another – the risk of future fractures rises with each new fracture; known as ‘the cascade effect’.3

The bones most likely to break or fracture are the hip, spine (vertebrae) and wrist; however any bone can be affected.⁴ People with vertebral and/or hip fractures have a significantly higher risk of morbidity than people with fractures elsewhere. ⁴ However, two-thirds of vertebral fractures are never identified or treated, even though they nearly all cause some pain.3

Early diagnosis is critical

It’s essential that low bone density is identified early as it’s the best way to prevent the risk of fractures or repeat fractures.3

The diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis begins with an objective measurement of your bone density. When doctors detect bone loss in the earliest stage, treatment is more successful.1

Know your bone density and reduce your risk of fractures

A DXA scan (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) is the gold standard for the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) and diagnosis of osteoporosis or osteopenia (low bone density).2

A DXA scan a simple low-dose procedure that takes less than 5 minutes. It typically consists of a lumbar spine and hip scan. The result of a DXA scan is expressed as a T-score which compares a person’s BMD with the average BMD of a 30 year old of the same sex. ⁴,⁵ 

An additional DXA capability is an Instant Vertebral Assessment™ (IVA). This is a 15-second, low-dose lateral scan of the entire spine and allows doctors to identify any existing vertebral fractures, which may indicate the need for more aggressive treatment. An IVA may be performed in conjunction with a bone density test and the results are immediately available for the doctor’s review.

Preparing for a bone density scan.

Unless instructed otherwise, eat normally on the day of the exam; but avoid taking calcium supplements for at least 24 hours prior to your appointment. Wear loose, comfortable clothing. Track suits and other casual clothing without zippers, buttons or any metal are preferred. You should not have had a barium study, radioisotope injection, oral or intravenous contrast material from a CT scan or MRI within 7 days of your DXA scan.

What to expect during your scan.
During a DXA scan, you will lie comfortably on a padded table while the DXA unit scans two or more areas, usually the hip and spine. Radiation exposure during bone densitometry is extremely low. The entire process takes only minutes to complete.

Advanced Body Composition™ Assessment

What is Advanced Body Composition™ Assessment?

An Advanced Body Composition exam is a quick, low dose X-ray exam that measures the three main tissues of the human body: fatty tissue, lean tissue, and bone. It may help your health professional assess what level of exercise or intervention is needed to maintain a good ratio between fat and lean muscle mass.

Who is it suitable for?

An Advanced Body Composition assessment is suitable for people on weight management programs as well as athletes in training.

It is also used for monitoring certain diseases such as Sarcopenia and Lipodystrophy and the effects of some medical therapies.

For those on weight management programs, the results may help determine your risk of developing obesity-related conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome and osteoarthritis. The exam precisely measures how much excess fat is present and where the fat is distributed in the body.

Knowing where the excess fat is located may make a considerable difference in health outcomes. Too much fat around abdominal organs such as the liver, for instance, can be much worse than excess fat just under the skin as it contributes more greatly to obesity-related diseases.

An Advanced Body Composition assessment is also commonly used as a measurement tool by athletes in training or rehabilitation to monitor neuromuscular changes and the effects of physical training over time. The results will show how your lean and fatty tissue is distributed to help you put yourself on the road to success.

Ask your healthcare professional if Advanced Body Composition is suitable for you.

Preparing for an Advanced Body Composition™ Assessment.
  • Unless instructed otherwise, eat normally on the day of the exam; but avoid taking calcium supplements for at least 24 hours prior to your appointment.
  • Wear loose, comfortable clothing without zippers, buttons or any metal.
  • You should not have had a barium study, radioisotope injection, oral or intravenous contrast material from a CT scan or MRI within seven days prior to your Advanced Body Composition assessment

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    BOX HILL VIC 3128
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    Wagga Wagga

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    Level 1, Suite 14, 325 Edward Street
    WAGGA WAGGA NSW 2650
    P 02 6971 6100
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